The Power of Color

Color plays a significant role for the human brain. Color generates emotions, creates ideas, expresses messages, and sparks interest. Red says stop and green says to go, and together red and green are seen as Christmas. Bright colors set a happy and positive mood, whereas dark colors project the opposite. Light colors appear closer, whereas dark colors appear to recede. Warm colors like red, orange, and yellow show excitement, optimism, and creativity, whereas cool colors like green, blue and gray symbolize security, calmness, and harmony.

“All colors arouse specific associative ideas…”

Yves Klein, French artist

Colors chosen for a website use the psychology of color to provide strength and relevance to the design. It’s never about choosing colors simply because they look nice and you like them — it’s about choosing colors that will generate the desired response from your marketing materials and help create a connection with customers. 

Here are some surprising pairs that work:

brown and orange

Real Estate
Brown and Orange
Why? Associated with home, hearth, and stability.
Says: At home I’m safe and comfortable.

Financial Services
Green and Blue
Why? Commands authority and inspires trust.
Says: My money is safe here.

Home Services
Black and Burnt Sienna
Why? Down to earth values, authoritative.
Says: I trust these people

Health Products
Brown and Lime Green
Why? Reflective of nature and healing
Says: I feel a calm confidence

Entertainment
Orange and Turquoise
Why? Playful and energetic
Says: I feel good about this service

Want to learn more about the psychology of color? 

Need a logo makeover, but don’t know where to start? Just send us a link to your current logo, whether or not it was designed in 1920 or 2020. We’ll assess whether it’s aesthetically tired or timeliness, how it tests on the myriad of technological devices that showcase your logo online, and analyze the color psychology from an outsider’s point of view. It may need only slight shifts, a simple refresh, or a whole new makeover. Don’t you think your business is worth finding out?! Analyze My Logo

Website Design Trends 2020

Every Christmas season, bloggers in the website design space love to write about “Website Trends for [fill in the year].” ActiveCanvas pays attention, learns new things, and sometimes we adopt a trend—if it’s the right thing for the clients we serve. Because we specialize in custom websites, our design goals are simple: know our client, understand our client’s audiences. Then design to increase their value to their customers and drive operational effectiveness.

That said, here’s a collection of the more interesting trends for 2020 in website design:

Minimalism—sites that are clean and simple with plenty of white space and easy navigation that make for a better user experience. In our opinion, your message and resulting customer engagement has always been the main focus.

Unique color stories—lighter shades with a pop of color that allow users to focus on the main purpose of the website rather than be distracted by design.

Rich content—dynamic content such as sound, video and images, e.g., a countdown timer that offers visitors a limited-time offer. A key attractiveness of websites is the rich multi-sensory experience potential.

Accessible design—use ADA-compliant standards to enable people with disabilities (such as blindness or even color-blindness) to have better access to your message. 

Voice technology—accessible design that enables voice-activated searches, making it easier for visitors with physical disabilities to engage your brand.

Mobile-first to Mobile-Only design—because a lower percentage of people are accessing the web on big screens.

Which trends do you like, or think you could use? Share your comments on our Facebook page.

5 Things You Didn’t Know Your Website Needs

Your website is your face to the world and business decisions will be made in milliseconds when it’s visited. Your site can be a game-changer or an also-ran. Take a look at your site now to see if it’s good-to-go on at least these five things: 

  1. HTTPS—Every website URL should start with the letters https, not just http, even if it doesn’t handle sensitive information. If you don’t do it for yourself and your company, do it for your visitors. The world is full of “bad guys” who want to exploit every opportunity to maliciously hack or install malware on an unprotected site. It will soon be mandatory to be HTTPS, which is Secure HTTP, so if your website URL is still simply HTTP (without the S for secure), fix it now.
  2. White Space—White space is a term used for empty space in a website. It doesn’t need to be white. It just needs to be empty. White space around paragraphs and between sentences increases comprehension and encourages reading. White space helps guide a user from one idea to the next… increasing the chance of contact, interaction, or a sale.
  3. Color—Similar to the power of white space, color is critical. First, limit the palette to 2 or 3 major colors, a single background color (white is best), and one accent color. Use a link color that is visible to the color blind. Choose colors that complement your brand image (logo) and your brand identity (who you say you are). Explore the psychology of color here. (spoiler alert: blue is safe).
  4. CTAs—Calls to Action are things such as email or newsletter subscription forms, free downloads, contact links, social media sharing, videos to be viewed, or prompting for a question. A CTA creates a connection between you and your visitor. In all business, relationship building is the key to success, and strong CTAs can help get you there.
  5. Clean Code—You can’t see it, but it’s probably the most important element of a great website. If you’ve never used your browser to view a website’s code, you should try it. Template-based sites tend to have hundreds, even thousands of lines of code, most of it unused. But every line has to load. A well-coded site has only the code it needs. It’s lightning-fast and provides the ultimate user experience every time. To check your site’s code in the Chrome browser, open your website; in Chrome’s navigation bar, click View, Developer, View Source.

But what about SEO, navigation, site maps, action buttons, optimized images, web fonts, responsive design, and you name it? Well, there’s always another day for another helpful blog about user-centered websites. If you can’t wait, call us. (772) 936-7969.