Why You Should Not Design Your Own Logo

Your logo is your most powerful branding tool. It is far more than your name in pretty type or a clip art symbol in your favorite color. 

Your logo is the primary connection between your product or service and your customer or client. It’s an emotional connection that creates an instant opinion, mark of credibility, and level of confidence. 

Your logo’s emotional response is markedly affected by the psychology of color, font choice, and message.

Here are the reasons why you shouldn’t design your own logo:

1. You Probably Don’t Have The Right Tools
Logo Maker and Canva are tools, but not the right tools. The right tools are a combination of professional design software and someone who understands branding, color theory, and how the human brain responds to both color and typography. No amount of tutorials will defeat the work of a professional Graphic Designer with Adobe Creative Suite, a sizable font library and decades of experience.

2. Your Logo Signals Your Professionalism
Your logo is not your brand, but it is part of your brand. Brand is your values, the beliefs that drive your company and what makes you different. A strong brand serves as your voice and personality, and demonstrates to potential customers how they can expect to be treated. A professionally designed logo creates that signal.

3. Your Focus is Sales, Not Design
You built your business to create revenue, to make sales, to make a positive difference in your life and the lives of those you serve. Your product or service is what creates revenue. Without sales, you cannot invest in design. So, build your business and run your business with fierce determination and let the professionals handle the design aspects.

“BRANDING is strategic. MARKETING is tactical. 
MARKETING may contribute to a BRAND, but the BRAND is bigger than any particular MARKETING effort.” 

—James Heaton, Brand Strategist

A logo that was once modern and compelling can lose its power over time, or refuse to adapt to a digital world. If outdated, there can exist a perception that an organization is out-of-touch. Perhaps your values have changed over time, or the original logo needs to be simplified. Or maybe, your brand simply needs a gentle kick in the pants to meet today’s competitive landscape. 

If you recognize that your branding no longer reflects your company’s values, or it just feels out of date, you’ve already taken that first step forward. We offer no-obligation written assessments of your current brand. You have nothing to lose, except more business!

Does Your Website Pay for Itself?

When we meet with a prospect, we often ask: “What problems does your business have that a website can solve? More often than not, the response is something like, “Well, I was hoping you could tell me.” 

Everyone acknowledges that they need a website, however, many still believe that a website is not much more than a digital billboard. We know it’s much more. It’s your…

  • first impression
  • major credibility factor 
  • problem solving machine
  • extra salesperson
  • friendly receptionist
  • email marketer
  • full-time networker
  • customer support

If you sell things or hold events, it’s your ticketing agent, cashier, inventory control manager, scheduler, event coordinator, and publicity agent. 

If you think you can’t justify the cost of a professional, custom built website that solves your customer’s problems — think again. What you save in man-hours proves you can!

For example, according to digital.com, a basic informational website is $2,000 to $8,000 with very little customization. A website management firm will charge for domain name transfers/renewals, hosting fees, responsive layouts, built-in SEO, favorite icon design, images, secure shopping carts, SSL fees, selling fees, monthly email marketing campaigns, multiple-managed social media posts, and content and software updates. These, and a well-written monthly blog, add up to another $5,000 to $12,000 a year. If you pay for these services monthly, the cost per year increases from $500 to $5,000. 

So consider this: the salary for a marketing manager with digital savvy who can write and code is about $40,000 – $60,000 a year. In our Florida market, our customers pay an average of $6,000, plus $300 – $600 per month for maintenance, blogging, email marketing, social media services, and SEO. Amortized over 5 years, that’s $550 a month. 

Now think of your website as a member of your sales team, or the head of marketing, or your outside salesforce. If built and maintained well, your website can save tens of thousands per year, pretty much enough to hire that extra sales or marketing pro to close the deals the website brings in.